#Babypurrs #Cuddling

#Babypurrs #Cuddling

www.eiocoaliton.org

www.eiocoaliton.org

Transgender Resources

thebodyisnotanapology:

by West Anderson, Content Writer

image

[Image description: A side view of a row of books leaning on each other. The books have blank jacket covers in different colors: blue, orange, green, red, yellow, and pink. The word “resources” is in black text above the books.]

As I learned when I was first examining my gender and looking for answers, the internet is filled with resources to help transgender people – with everything from naming their gender, finding pronouns, and swapping clothes - to information and advice about medically transitioning.

It can be difficult for a trans person to find that info, hidden as it is in poorly formatted sites, personal blogs, and under a mound of Google search results. I think it’s incredibly important, however, as it can help trans people find help and community. As a community that often grapples with inner dysphoria and messages of hatred from outer sources, coming together and sharing love, knowledge, and resources is important to help every trans person get the support they need.

So I thought I would compile a list of resources that I have seen floating around the internet for trans people and their families and allies. Some of these helped me when I was first coming out, some I haven’t used. But all are directed at helping trans people be themselves to the fullest, in whatever way is best for them. So, whether you’re a cisgender ally, a person looking for answers about their own gender, or a trans person who has known their gender for years, I hope this is helpful.

Some of the links I share use terminology that I don’t personally use, such as FTM (female-to-male) or MTF (male-to-female). The transgender community has generally moved away from these terms, and uses the terms CAFAB/CAMAB (coercively assigned female/male at birth) or AFAB/AMAB (assigned female/male at birth) or DFAB/DMAB (designated female/male at birth) to talk about what gender the doctors assigned us at birth. This terminology is more useful because many of us feel that we were not one gender and then became another, but rather that a gender was foisted upon us and aggressively enforced by families, peers, media, and so on. Some feel that although we were assigned a gender at birth, we have always been our true gender. Intersex people also use this terminology to talk about the coercive way their bodies have been forced into a binary gender and sex at birth.

I hope these resources will still be useful, and feel free to send a message if you have another resource I should add.

Finally, I try not to split up my resources into AFAB and AMAB. Being assigned a gender at birth tells one nothing about someone’s body or needs, so I have tried to leave things open for people of all genders to use as they need, rather than enforcing a harmful dichotomy. I also didn’t split things up into trans women and trans men, since there are many people who fall outside the binary, and I don’t want anyone to feel excluded.

Most of my resources do categorize themselves by birth assignment or gender. There is a split in the needs of AFAB and AMAB trans people, and I don’t want to pretend that there isn’t. But for my post I wanted to try to leave things as open as possible. The resources I link to will do differently.

On to the resources:

Read More

Pronouns and Misgendering

thebodyisnotanapology:

by West Anderson, Content Writer

image

[Image description: A picture of the author wearing a black knit winter hat that has the word “they” across it in white capital letters with a row of pink hearts above and below the word. The hat has a white pom-pom at the top. West is a white non-binary…

#NOT1MORE
#MMIW 
#STOLENSISTERS

#NOT1MORE
#MMIW
#STOLENSISTERS

#O22 #UAPTSD 
#STOLENLIVES #VICTIMSVOICESHEARD

#O22 #UAPTSD
#STOLENLIVES #VICTIMSVOICESHEARD

#O22 UAPTSD.ORG

#O22 UAPTSD.ORG